Feeling Stopped Up?

Most people know that regular bowel function is imperative for proper detoxification of the body and disease prevention. Sometimes, though, we forget the little things that help with constipation.

Here they are:

  1. Are you drinking enough water? People need about half their weight in ounces per day of water i.e.: a 160 pound woman needs about 80 ounces water. You’ll need extra if you drink diuretics such as coffee. Adequate water intake helps with bowel function, kidney function, and lubricates the joints. Drink your prescribed amount of water for about 2 weeks to see the full effect.  Some people say they don’t like water. This is a sign that your body is not detoxifying correctly- all the more reason to drink water! Adding a little lemon juice to the water usually makes it more palatable to drink.
  2. Are you eating enough fiber? To make sure you are eating enough fiber, eat 2 servings of fruit and 3 servings of veggies per day. This amounts to 2 medium size salads, and 2 apples for snacks, or the equivalent. Raw or cooked veggies are fine.
  3. When these steps fail, try eating 3-6 soaked prunes each morning. Just take 3-6 organic, unsulfured prunes, put them in a bowl, and cover them with water the night before. Eat them in the morning.

When these steps fail, it means there is another underlying cause of your constipation. A correctly performed Nutrition Response Testing exam will find the underlying cause.

Sleep

10 Forgotten Things to Help Sleep

Previously, I wrote about how to help your sleep naturally. However, I forgot to include some easy, almost common sense cures!  Here they are:

  1. Cut your caffeine. It’s estimated that 50% of the population is sensitive to caffeine, often without knowing it. Try cutting caffeine (especially coffee) after 12pm.  If you’re like me, and you love an afternoon cup of coffee, substitute green tea, or herbal tea (mint teas especially, since they are relaxing).  Green tea has a small amount of caffeine, but doesn’t seem to affect sleep like coffee.  If you think you’re extra sensitive to caffeine, try cutting it out altogether.
  2. Cut down artificial light. Melatonin is the primary sleep hormone. Artificial light, especially blue light,  disrupts its production in your brain.  Computers, phones, iPads, Kindles, Nooks, and televisions are particularly bad. You can do two things about this:  turn off those sources of artificial light when it gets dark or get blue light blocking glasses to wear once it gets dark outside.  Uvex and Solar Shield are two popular, inexpensive brands.  This really helps, plus you’ll look cool while wearing them!
  3. Try eating more carbs at dinner. The pineal gland makes melatonin out of tryptophan. As a result, this gland controls the body’s circadian rhythm.  Carbs increase tryptophan’s access to the pineal gland. I recommend eating carbs like fruit and root vegetables(such as sweet potatoes), not grains and processed sugars (both of which aggravate autoimmune conditions and other health concerns in the body). 30-40 grams of carbs should do it.
  4. Keep your bedroom as dark as possible. Even small amounts of light disrupt sleep patterns and melatonin production. Try using black out shades.
  5. Keep your bedroom cool. During sleep, your core temperature drops. Encourage this by keeping your bedroom below 68 degrees.
  6. Try to actively relax during the day. Stress hormones discourage sleep. Relaxation lowers overall stress hormone levels in the body.  Just 15 minutes of yoga, meditation, deep breathing, or some other relaxation technique helps immensely.  I like to practice deep breathing every afternoon for 15-20 minutes.
  7. Get outside during peak sun hours, even in the winter! Natural light helps reset your circadian rhythm. Try and get outside every day.
  8. Exercise during the day. Exercise lowers stress hormones at night, encouraging sleep.
  9. Keep a to-do list. Write everything you have to do the next day in a journal, notepad or whatever. Writing it down helps to get it out of your head so that you can sleep better.
  10. Keep a grateful log. Write down 3 things you are grateful for. I also find it helpful to write down the things  I got to do that day that I enjoyed.  Emphasizing the positive really helps change your mindset long-term.

Try these out.  I confess I don’t do them all, just he ones that are easiest for me to do.  You can do the same.  Just keep trying each one on the list until you sleep like a baby.  If you still have trouble, see the first article that I wrote on sleep.

Fixing Lyme Disease

Fixing Lyme Disease

So how exactly did I go about fixing my Lyme Disease?  Well, first, let me recap on 5 crucial steps to fixing Lyme Disease:

  1. I admitted that I had Lyme disease.
  2. I became 100% determined to beat Lyme disease, mostly by myself, with help from my teachers.
  3. I promised myself that I would do whatever it takes to beat Lyme disease once and for all, even if it meant that I had to give up things, or change the way I lived.
  4. I put myself in charge of eradicating this disease.
  5. I took it as a personal mission to help as many people with Lyme disease as possible.

Basically, I totally confronted the problem.  This I think is the most important step to fixing any problem.  Once I made the above decisions, I realized “It must be hanging out in some weak area of my body”. I sat with this for a while and realized that I had had weaknesses in my lungs, kidneys, adrenal glands, liver, and gallbladder, and taken supplements for them.  But the problem kept coming back.  I also had swollen lymph nodes off and on since I was about 14, and even gotten surgery twice because of this situation.

The lymph system is a little hard to test, as it is literally everywhere, and can be a problem anywhere.  So I went to the lymph nodes that regularly caused problems in my body, and guess what I found?  Some sort of bacterial challenge, and it was bad (in Nutrition Response Testing, we keep away from “diagnosing” anything to keep the FDA off our back, but we can say that we have an immune system challenge)!  I had hit paydirt!

Next, using Nutrition Response Testing Acute Dosing Protocol, I found which supplements would support the organ (the lymph nodes) and immune system challenge (bacterial) that came up. I took the dosage I found, but instead of taking it daily, I took it hourly!  As my brilliant wife had pointed out, I had an acute exacerbation of a long term problem, that needed help right now! The results were undeniable:  the cough that I had immediately stopped, and the open wound I had in one of the infected lymph nodes for 6 months healed in two days.  It was a miracle. I kept this protocol up until I felt 100% better, then I gradually cut down the supplements as my body indicated with muscle testing.

So what did I learn from this?

  1. If it looks like Lyme and acts like Lyme, it’s probably Lyme!
  2. You’ve got to use Nutrition Response Testing locate the immune system weakness exactly.
  3. You’ve got to use Nutrition Response Testing to test exactly what you need to support the weakness.
  4. You’ve got to follow through 100% on your supplement program.  This may take time.
  5. I had to totally stop eating refined sugar, grains, and pasteurized dairy.
  6. I had to adhere to a diet of fruits, veggies, meats, nuts and oils in order to rebuild my immune system.
  7. I had to handle the different stresses in my life to take the pressure off of my immune system.
  8. Sometimes I had to take wayyyyyyyy more of the supplements I tested for than what is generally suggested.  Basically, I had to go with what my body said to do, instead of what someone else who wasn’t in my body said.
  9. I had to trust that my body knew what it wanted, and if I wasn’t feeling better, I just hadn’t found the problem yet.
  10. Lyme disease is definitely curable.

I hope this 4 part series into my own personal health challenge helps you with your own health challenge.  Keep tuned each week for more advice on how you can help yourself live a happier, healthier life!

"Great guns" against Lyme Disease

“Great Guns” Against Lyme Disease

At this point, I’d like to point out that I would say that my Lyme disease was officially diagnosed in 2014, even though I think it really began in 2011 with a tick bite.  Or did it really start before that?  I mean, I had a history of childhood and adult illnesses including: allergies, asthma, recurrent severe prolonged bronchitis, Ulcerative Colitis, Salmonella poisoning, finally culminating with Lyme disease.

Or was it just that I had gotten sick as a child, never really gotten healthy again, and continually gotten sicker until I finally pulled all the stops and, as my Mom would say, “go great guns” against anything that was living in me that I didn’t want setting up shop anymore.  I would like to point out that ever since my Salmonella poisoning when I was 21 I had migrating pains.  My first bout of back pain followed my diagnosis of Ulcerative Colitis.  Basically, I never felt good until recently, when I went “great guns” against whatever was infecting me.

Here’s my own take on it.  I think that I was either born with a weakened immune system, or got some kind of infection very early in life.  I think that each illness was just either an exacerbation of the old infection, or a new thing taking up residence in my weakened immune system.  It’s important to note that to get over both my Lyme and Salmonellosis, I had to cut grains and sugar out of my diet.  I, like most people, find that these two foods weaken my immune system greatly.  Guess what I lived on as a kid?  You guessed it, grains and sugar!  No wonder I kept getting sick.

Here’s a list of things associated with my Lyme disease:

  1. Asthma
  2. Allergies
  3. Migrating pains (neck, shoulders, low back, knees)
  4. Recurrent swollen lymph nodes
  5. Boils
  6. Depression
  7. Anxiety
  8. Fatigue
  9. Forgetfulness
  10. Brain Fog
  11. Irritability
  12. Panic attacks
  13. Weight gain
  14. Insomnia

Next week, I’ll clue you in to exactly how I was able to locate and eliminate what was weakening my immune system, and how exactly I killed the Lyme bug.