3 Types of Exercise

One of the most common questions I get when consulting with at patient about getting them healthy again is “what type of exercise should I do?”  I usually tell them “the best exercise for you is the one that you will do.”  While that’s the long and short of it, that’s usually not enough of an answer for people, so let’s break this down.

Let’s talk about 3 general types of exercise.

  1. High intensity-30 min/wk,
    1. Pros-
      • raises fat burning hormones
      • builds muscle
      • sensitizes insulin, and
      • burns fat post exercise (post-exercise oxygen consumption).
    2. Cons-
      • raises stress hormones (may be too much for those already under stress or tired)
      • difficult
      • may be injury producing if not done properly (you must do this type of exercise properly!).
    3. Examples
      • sprinting (running, cycling, or swimming)
      • certain types of weightlifting
      • Crossfit
  2. Moderate intensity-1 .5-3 hrs./wk
    1. Pros
      • good for “getting in shape”
      • not too difficult
      • usually “fun”(games such as tennis, soccer, and hockey, as well as “leisure” exercise, such as the more difficult types of yoga, jogging, and weightlifting fall in to this category)
      • not as high of risk of injury
      • does not raise stress hormones too much
      • sensitizes insulin
      • builds muscle
      • Burns calories (and potentially fat).
    2. Cons
      • takes 1 ½ to 3 hours per week.
    3. Examples-
      • Tennis,
      • Soccer
      • Hockey
      • “Leisure” exercise, such as the more difficult types of yoga, jogging, and weightlifting

      3. Low intensity-5 hrs./wk

      1. Pros-
        • lowered stress hormones to burn fat
        • very gentle, very low risk of injury
        • you don’t need a partner
        • you don’t need to go to the gym
        • inexpensive
      2. Cons-
        • May be limited by weather (walking, jogging, and biking)
        • Not much, if any post exercise calorie and fat burning
        • You need to do a lot to benefit from it
      3. Examples-
        • Walking
        • Jogging
        • Biking
        • Yoga
        • Swimming

There you have it, the three general groups of exercise.  You can mix and match these, in fact, that’s probably the best way to do them.  For example, you could work out with weights for 1 hour, 3 days per week, and take a leisurely walk for ½ hour each morning to get in your high intensity, moderate intensity, and low intensity exercise.

Or you could go to a yoga class 3 days per week, for 1 hours per session, and maybe lift weights 2 days per week, for 1 hour per session.  Like I said, the most important thing is that you actually pick an exercise that you will do consistently.

I hate vegetables. Help!

What do I do if I hate vegetables?  I know I have to eat them for better health, but they don’t taste that great, and boring!

Listen, I know what it’s like to know that I need to eat more veggies, but I don’t have the time to cook them, or even eat them in the quantities they’re needed in.  So I found this great tip by Dr. Eric Berg.  Basically, you make your veggies into a smoothie.  I thought it sounded pretty gross when I first heard of it, but I’ve got to say, I drink them just about every day now!  It’s all about how you prepare them. Here’s the ingredients list:

  1. 1-2 cups Berries (you should stick to lower sugar berries such as blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, and blackberries)
  2. Kale-the amount can vary. I use 4-6 cups of kale and squish it down, but it you’re giving this to a child, they may insist on a little less.  Go with however much you want.  I like to use kale, because overall, it’s one of the highest nutrient vegetables, but you can use another veggie or veggies if you like.
  3. Protein powder-this is totally optional. I use it because it makes my shakes taste good, and I exercise every day.  As a shameless self-promo, I use my own protein powder I designed because it has no sugar, has all natural flavors and sweeteners, and kids love it!
  4. Sweetener-you can add a little stevia if you like, but it’s totally up to you.
  5. Some coconut milk or an avocado-1/4 cup of coconut milk (the type that comes in the can), or a cup of coconut milk from the carton, or an avocado go a long way in making it much creamier and palatable. As an added bonus, they also add fat to help balance your blood sugar and hormones, and if you add avocado, you’ll get a ton of potassium-win!

Now here’s the trick.  You blend it for a couple of minutes, usually 2 minutes will do. If you don’t blend it well enough, it’s all chunky and nasty.  Drink a portion of it when you blend it, and you can save the rest for later.

There you go, that’s it!  A quick way to get in a day’s vegetables, which even kids will love!  Feel free to check out our Pinterest page: we try to pin a lot of smoothie recipes there that we’ve found.

 

Feeling Stopped Up?

Most people know that regular bowel function is imperative for proper detoxification of the body and disease prevention. Sometimes, though, we forget the little things that help with constipation.

Here they are:

  1. Are you drinking enough water? People need about half their weight in ounces per day of water i.e.: a 160 pound woman needs about 80 ounces water. You’ll need extra if you drink diuretics such as coffee. Adequate water intake helps with bowel function, kidney function, and lubricates the joints. Drink your prescribed amount of water for about 2 weeks to see the full effect.  Some people say they don’t like water. This is a sign that your body is not detoxifying correctly- all the more reason to drink water! Adding a little lemon juice to the water usually makes it more palatable to drink.
  2. Are you eating enough fiber? To make sure you are eating enough fiber, eat 2 servings of fruit and 3 servings of veggies per day. This amounts to 2 medium size salads, and 2 apples for snacks, or the equivalent. Raw or cooked veggies are fine.
  3. When these steps fail, try eating 3-6 soaked prunes each morning. Just take 3-6 organic, unsulfured prunes, put them in a bowl, and cover them with water the night before. Eat them in the morning.

When these steps fail, it means there is another underlying cause of your constipation. A correctly performed Nutrition Response Testing exam will find the underlying cause.

Approaching Lyme Disease

One thing I sometimes get asked about is Lyme disease, or, more specifically, do I treat Lyme disease.  The short answer is that no, I don’t treat Lyme disease.  However, I can tell you that I have a lot of success helping people that have Lyme disease get over it.  What’s the difference?  Well, let me tell you my own story with Lyme disease, and hopefully that’ll shed some light on the situation.

I was never a very healthy child.  I grew up suffering with allergies and asthma, for which I had to almost constantly take medication for.  I was always sick.  I remember when I was 14, during the winter, I had some kind of bronchitis that lasted the whole winter.  It was so bad that I had that “seal cough”, the one that’s really loud, and sounds horrible.  I used to use it to annoy the teachers in school (they couldn’t tell me to stop, it sounded like I was hacking up a lung!).  The doctors were stumped, couldn’t do anything about it, luckily, it “went away”, meaning the symptoms went away.  Two years later, I developed “trench mouth”, an infection of my gums, where they cracked and bled continually for a week.  I couldn’t eat for a week (I consumed only soup).  It’s important to note that I got trench mouth not from poor hygiene, I brushed thoroughly twice a day, but that I got it from a poor immune system. When I was 17, after a particularly stressful event, I developed Ulcerative Colitis.  I lost 20 pounds in a matter of weeks from that one.  When I was 21, I went to Mexico, where I picked up Salmonellosis, which almost killed me.  So now that you know my past history of severe illness, why did I tell you all of this?  Because I wanted to let you know that I, like many of my patients, have an underlying cause.  What’s that common thread from all of the above problems?  My immune system stinks (as does my father’s and brother’s immune system, I like to blame my parents for this!  JK!).

Following my Salmonellosis diagnosis, I really got into nutritional studies.  The salmonella poisoning had left me with digestive issues, and chronic, debilitating low back pain, that chiropractic could not help at all.  I went through this for 2 and ½ years.  It was only by cutting out grains, and sugar, that I regained my health quickly.  Not only did my digestive issues and pain totally clear up, but I also lost 40 pounds of fat!  Hot dog!

So how did I go about developing full blown Lyme disease?  Well, like most of my patients, I started slacking with my diet, letting in grains, and sugars, slowly but surely over time.  I didn’t have the worst diet, but it certainly wasn’t the best.  I was under stress with some personal upheaval in my life.  Then, one day Laura and I went camping in the woods in the spring of 2011.  I remember it was very cold, below freezing, and my Chihuahua Taquito kept on hogging my sleeping bag and blankets, as was his style.  When I awoke in the morning, I felt something weird on my back, and when I asked Laura to take a look, she said “you’ve got a tick sticking out of you!”, and pulled it out.  I thought nothing of it, I was tired, but otherwise felt fine.  But a couple of weeks later, I felt some pain in my left armpit.  When I lifted it up, I was horrified.  I had a huge, purple swollen lymph node.  The purple part was about 6” wide.  I had no idea what it was, as this was now about 2 months after our camping trip.  As I had not had the Advanced Clinical Training in Nutrition Response Testing, I also was not able to test and see if it was Lyme disease.  Gradually, the initial swelling subsided, but this would not be the last time I would see it…

So let’s recap.  From this history, we can see that:

  1. I have a genetically weak immune system
  2. I have an intolerance to grains and sugar (compounding my immune system problems)
  3. I’ve had a lot of stress in my life (who hasn’t! this is important to note though)
  4. I have a history of a tick bite
  5. I have a history of exposure to Mercury (wait a second! How did I fail to mention that before?  While in chiropractic school, I broke a thermometer, and absorbed some of the mercury into my wedding ring.  It actually turned to a silver color, before turning back to gold.  My body absorbed the mercury from the ring.  I also had mercury amalgams).

All of this created the perfect storm, like so many other of my patients.  Tune in next week to see the long and drawn out road I had to take to fix myself (and how it taught me about what so many of my patients are going through!)

See you next week!

~Dr. Sheehan

Surmounting Stress

Surmouning stress in today’s world can seem impossible. Dr. Sheehan weighs in on his own view of stress and what we can do to master our stress and live more relaxed and productive lives.

So what exactly is stress?  Where does it come from?  What effects does it have on my body, and my soul?  What can I do about it?  To answer all of these, and more, we must first talk about the three types of stress, so we can adequately determine what type(s) we have, and then we can determine what to do about them.

Let me start off by saying that there are lots of different ways of dealing with stress, this is not the only way.

Let us start by splitting stress into 3 different categories:

  1. Physical stress-this is stress you feel in your body, and comes from nutritional deficiencies, and incorrect eating habits for you. This is the one that we will primarily deal with tonight.  Physical stress will make the other stresses less manageable.  Your body sees stress in an additive way, in other words, it all adds up. If you have 10 units of physical stress, 4 units of mental stress, and 3 units of Spiritual Stress, you have an overall stress index of 17.
  2. Mental stress-this is stress you usually feel in your head, although it can be felt anywhere in your body, and comes from someone or something either stopping you from doing something, or forcing you to do something you do not really want to do (but usually feel that you have to).
  3. Spiritual stress-this comes from not doing something you know you really should do, or doing something you shouldn’t be doing. It’s more self-imposed than mental stress.

Just knowing the three types of stress makes most people feel better already.  It also makes dealing with stress less of a Herculean task.

So how do we deal with stress?  In a nutshell, here’s the way to deal with the three different types of stress:

  1. Physical stress-We use Nutrition Response Testing to deal with this. In a nutshell, cut down on sugar and carbs, up the protein and fats to balance blood sugar, and stress hormones.  Address nutritional deficiencies in the body, especially those affecting the heart, liver, adrenal glands, brain, minerals, and hormones in the body.  Also make sure that there in not a neurotransmitter imbalance that can be helped by organ support, herbal and amino acid supplementation.
  2. Mental and Spiritual Stress-there is a fair amount of overlap of these two, so it’s better if we lump them together. Make a list of all the things you want to do in your life.  Really do this, write it down.  Are you doing them?  Answer that question first.  If you are not doing them, why not?  If the answer is a person or a thing that is keeping you from what you are doing, that is a mental stress.
  3. Is there anything you should be doing, but are not? Make a list, like you did in #2.  Like are you smoking, and know that you shouldn’t?  How about overeating?  How about exercise?  How about meditating?  The list can go on and on.  Bringing awareness to this subject though, is often quite illuminating, and often helps us.  You get the idea.
  4. Another thing get stressed about a lot, and this can cause spiritual and mental stress, is repetitive thoughts they have, which are stressful. A friend I know who was very into stress reduction decided one day to write down his thoughts all day.  To his amazement, he wrote the same four things, over and over all day!  Our minds are perpetual motion machines, and when they have nothing to do, they just keep working, working, working, and it’s not usually something nice and positive they work on.  As a quick exercise, if everyone could hear your thoughts, would you be embarrassed, scared, or very proud of your evolved mind?  You get the idea.

So to deal with these stressful thoughts, I often turn to “The Work” by Byron Katie. If you don’t know who she is, look her up on YouTube, or better yet, buy one of her books, such as “Loving What Is”.  You can also look up her website.  She gives very clear instructions on how to do The Work.  Oftentimes, doing The Work, will help illuminate the answers to the three types of stress I have listed above.  I did The Work along with a facilitator for 4 years following an extremely stressful event in my life.  I can’t say enough good about it.  If I feel stressed, or can’t sleep (I’m a chronic insomniac, although it’s 85% better), I do The Work, and I totally chill out.  Just ask my wife.

From the above, it should be obvious to you that it’s easier to deal with some stress than others.  Here’s the trick to the whole thing though, that most people don’t know.  You’re body and mind add together all stress, and count it as one number.  You can also deal with it in the same way.  Sometimes it’s hard to deal with the mental and spiritual stress, but relatively easy to deal with the physical stresses.  In this case, deal with the physical stresses, which will bring down your overall stress load, and make you feel a lot better.  Then you’ll naturally deal with the mental and spiritual stresses easier:  it won’t feel as overwhelming to you.  In fact, that’s why we deal with primarily physical stress in our clinic, it makes it easier to deal with mental and spiritual stresses.

Photo Credit: Scott Koring

Sunday Breakfast

Sunday breakfast is my favorite breakfast of the week 🙂 On Sunday, I love to sleep in (if I can) and then have a leisurely  breakfast with my husband. In contrast to weekday breakfasts, I go all-out on Sunday. My typical rule is not to eat carbs for breakfast or lunch, because I noticed I have better energy throughout the day. But the “no-carb” breakfast rule is not in force on Sunday! My other rule is no sugar, and I do not break that, except every once in a great while, and not at breakfast. So on Sundays Keith and I love to cook breakfast together and enjoy spending some unhurried time with each other. It’s always a sad moment when 2 pm rolls around on a Sunday, which means the (short) weekend is almost over and it’s time to gear up for the coming week!

Because Sunday morning breakfast has become a bit of a ritual in my house, I wanted to share some of my favorite “breakfast treats”. I hope you enjoy!

Paleo Apple Fritters – Elana’s Pantry

Low Carb Pork Rind Pancakes – Mr. Breakfast      Yes….I know. Pork rinds! It’s what’s for breakfast!

Breakfast Frittata – The Paleo Mom

AIP Turkey Breakfast Sausage – Autoimmune Wellness (although I will probably use pastured pork for now, as we are both off poultry – long story)

Gluten Free French Toast – Paleogrubs (But I used Amaranth Gluten Free Bakery’s Sunflower and Honey Bread – o.m.g)

So I hope you try some of these recipes, which I have enjoyed myself very much.

Mommy Needs Whole Food Nutrition

Mommy needs whole food nutrition and the exact right supplement program (as determined by Nutrition Response Testing(R)). These are important for everyone’s health, but most importantly for hopeful, or expecting mothers. Getting onto a nutrition plan should begin well in advance of trying to conceive. This will ensure that mom (and dad!) have the best chance of an easy pregnancy and a healthy, well-nourished child. It makes sense! It’s because the proper development of the growing child depends on the nutrients available to the child from preconception through childhood.

Here are some important points for mommy and daddy to consider when baby-having is on their mind:

  1. Both mom and dad should be on a nutrition program at least three months before trying to conceive. This will improve their nutritional profile and ensure the baby has enough good vitamins and minerals to grow a healthy body.
  2. Whole food vitamins are perfectly safe and very effective for mommy and baby because they are made from food! Whole food vitamins are also great to help with milk production when breast-feeding.
  3. During pregnancy, as much as possible, eat foods in their whole form. Pasture-raised, organic, local–get the best quality you can. You’re growing another human body, in all of its wondrous complexity. This is not a time to skimp!
  4. Here is a great resource for feeding the family: http://www.westonaprice.org/childrens-health/

And now here is the featured diet log of our client T.  who had high blood sugar and now he has brought his blood sugar down to normal (and avoided having to take meds! Go!) and lost 15 lbs so far and is still losing. He is following a “ketogenic diet” which is very low in carbohydrates, and very high in fat. He says he does not even crave sugar or sweets on this high-fat diet.

Tues

Breakfast 3egg omelette, diced tomatoes, jalapenos, one spicy italian sausage, guacamole cooked in avocado oil with avocado oil poured onto it

Lunch 2 organic gluten free and dairy free hotdogs, goat cheese crumbles, poured avocado oil on them

Snack 2tbsp of Almond butter

Dinner 1 doz wings with broasted hotsauce, celery, dipped in guacamole

Snack 2tbsp of almond Butter

Wednesday

Breakfast 8 gluten free meatballs, goat cheese crumbles, sirracha sauce, covered in olive oil

Snack 2tbsp almond butter

Lunch pulled pork, guacamole, avocado oil

Dinner Chicken smothered in guacamole, broccoli

Snack 2tbsp almond butter

Protein Shakes Recipes

ShakesBanana Split 1 Serving chocolate or vanilla protein powder 8 oz. raw milk, almond or coconut milk, or water ½ ripe banana ½ cup chopped pineapple 4 frozen strawberries 1 tbsp. Essential Balance Oil 3 ice cubes Blend on high for 45 seconds and serve

PB & J Shake 1 serving vanilla protein powder 8 oz. raw milk, almond or coconut milk, or water 1 heaping tbsp. all natural peanut butter 4 frozen strawberries 1 tbsp. Essential Balance Oil Blend on high for 45 seconds and serve

Protein Power “Juice” 2 servings any flavor protein powder 8 oz. raw milk, almond or coconut milk, or water 1 tbsp. Essential Balance Oil 3 ice cubes Blend on high for 45 seconds and serve

Cookies & Cream 1 serving chocolate or vanilla protein powder 8 oz. raw milk, almond or coconut milk, or water 4 drops peppermint extract 3 ice cubes 1 tbsp. Essential Balance Oil Blend on high for 45 seconds Add 4 gluten-free chocolate wafers Blend at low speed for 10 seconds and serve

Cinnamon Roll Supreme 1 serving vanilla protein powder 8 oz. raw milk, coconut or almond milk, or water ½ tsp. ground cinnamon 1 tbsp. Essential Balance Oil 3 ice cubes Blend on high for 45 seconds and serve

Blueberry Banana Bonanza 1 serving vanilla protein powder 8 oz. raw milk, almond or coconut milk, or water 1 tbsp. Essential Balance Oil ½ cup frozen blueberries ½ banana 3 ice cubes Blend on high for 45 seconds and serve

Chocolate Peanut Butter Cup 1 serving chocolate protein powder 8 oz. raw milk, almond or coconut milk or water 1 heaping tbsp. all natural peanut (or almond) butter 1 tbsp. Essential Balance Oil 3 ice cubes (optional: ½ ripe banana) Blend on high for 45 seconds and serve

All recipes make one serving. You could substitute SP Complete for the Sheehan Chiropractic protein powder (or you could have them both). You could also substitute cashew or hemp milk for the almond, coconut, or raw milk.

Dr. Keith Sheehan is a Chiropractor and Holistic Practitioner practicing at 428 N. Duke Street in beautiful downtown Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Dr. Sheehan has had 12 years experience helping his clients with a wide variety of physical and biochemical conditions, using an individually tailored wellness approach and natural therapies. His clients appreciate his caring and direct approach his helpful, knowledgeable staff. To schedule a nutritional or chiropractic assessment, or for more information, please contact Dr. Sheehan at (717) 392-6606.

Natural Protection from the Sun

Sunburn – a Nutritional Deficiency Issue?

Did you know that a sunburn is actually a sign of nutritional imbalance? It means you don’t have enough calcium in your tissues. Tissue calcium provides sun protection. And just because you have enough blood or bone calcium does not necessarily mean you will have enough in your skin. Essential fatty acids (EFA’s) help mobilize calcium to the tissues and the skin, but unfortunately most of us are deficient in EFA’s, calcium, or both.

Easy Sun Protection Protocol

The good news is, there is an easy protocol if you want to protect yourself out in the sun that does not involve toxic chemical lotions. Just take 6 Calcium Lactate and 6 Cataplex F tablets every 2 hours during sun exposure. If you have very fair skin or the sun is especially strong, you can take that same dose every hour. Use in combination with a natural sunblock for best results, depending on your skin type.

What kind of results can you expect from using these products for sun protection? We hear our patients report they would not do without the Cataplex F and Calcium Lactate when they have to go out in the sun. On patient commented, “I can use the gentlest most non-toxic sun block and the supplement protocol combined, and stay out in the sun for hours. I have very fair skin, but I get a healthy rosy glow.”

Dr. Keith Sheehan is a Chiropractor and Holistic Practitioner practicing at 1301 East King Street, just 1.5 miles from beautiful downtown Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Dr. Sheehan has had 12 years experience helping his clients with a wide variety of physical and biochemical conditions, using an individually tailored wellness approach and natural therapies. His clients appreciate his caring and direct approach his helpful, knowledgeable staff. To schedule a nutritional or chiropractic assessment, or for more information, please contact Dr. Sheehan at (717) 392-6606.

7 Tips For Weight Loss

By Dr. Keith Sheehan

Ok, so, recently, I decided I was too fat, again. Yet, I was keeping my carbs low, and exercising, so what gives? Here’s what we already know about weight loss:

1. Find out what your food allergies are with Nutrition Response Testing, take the appropriate enzyme/acid preparation for that food allergy, and avoid that food 100%! This is a must!

2. Get a proper Nutrition Response TechniqueSM evaluation, to handle any nutritional deficiencies. This is a must. If you have any nutritional deficiencies that are not being handled, weight loss is going to be vastly more difficult!

3. Count carbohydrates (also known as “carbs”). If there are any questions about this, get one of the handouts on this from our office, we have two of them, based on the books “Life Without Bread”, and “The Schwarzbein Principle”. Depending on how much exercise you do, and how overweight you are, this will determine how much you have to cut them down to lose weight. Basically, you record how many grams of carbs you eat per day. If you want to lose weight, cut them down 5-25 grams per day, until you start losing weight, then stay at this level. You can re-evaluate this once per week. For instance, if, for week one, you average 150 grams of carbs per day, you can cut them down to 145-125 per day for week 2, and see how well this works. Let’s say that you choose to stay below 135 carbs per day, and you lose 1 pound this week. You stay at this level until you stop losing weight, where you then repeat the process. This is a very easy process, and takes a little time. You must count carbs every day to do this though, it’s an absolute must. One thing I’ve found is that if you have a hard time losing weight, you’ll probably need to cut your carbs to a minimum, like below 50 per day. If weight loss is no big deal for you, you’ll probably be fine around 100 carbs per day. Also, calorie restriction may work in the short term, but since it’s based on willpower, it fails 97% of the time (from overall dieting statistics). Changing your operating basis to a low carb lifestyle works, though.

These 3 steps will kick off weight loss quickly for over 95% of our patients. Here’s a couple of tips that I found to be useful to either 1) speed up this process, or 2) work though any plateaus you may encounter. I had to incorporate these to lose weight because I was already doing #1 – #3 above.

1. Exercise. People always ask me what exercise is the best exercise, and I always tell them it’s the exercise they will do every day. This being said, walking, and other “easier” exercises, will not work too well for weight loss, unless you are over 50 pounds overweight. Any kind of interval training is best. Interval training is defined as short bursts of activity, back to back with periods of low activity. Examples are sprinting, coupled with walking, weight lifting, coupled with resting, fast biking coupled with slow biking, and you get the idea. Here’s a couple of articles on it:

http://www.everydayhealth.com/fitness/high-intensity-interval-training-for-beginners.aspx

http://www.intervaltraining.net/HiitTraining-30.html

30 Day At Home Workout Challenge (Inspired by CrossFit)

http://www.strength-training-woman.com/interval-strength-training-routines.html

2. I think that you have to get into the mindset that you need to exercise every day, and that you have to switch up what you do every day, so that you don’t get bored. Getting into a habit of doing exercise every day makes it more of a habit. If you plan just to go to the gym twice per week, and you miss 1 workout per week, you’re down to 1 workout a week. With a busy schedule, this will happen a lot! That’s why I do the 30 day at home crossfit challenge every day, and shoot for 3-4 days of weight training. I know I’ll be exercising every day then.

3. Walking before and after lunch. When I am doing training down in Florida, I walk 1 mile to lunch, and one mile back to class after. I always lose about 3 pounds over the course of 4 days of doing this.

4. Make your dinner on the smaller side, even if you have your carbs really low. I think this has something to do with the fact that we digest more poorly as we age, and we tend to need less food as we age. Eating less naturally stimulates the detoxification process, and aids in sleep, to further lower stress hormones (like cortisol), to further weight loss. So to recap: the first 3 steps listed above will get your weight loss started, so start there. If you reach a plateau, or would like to go faster, to the next 4 steps. This will work for over 99% of the people. Good luck, and give me feedback on how your program is going!

Sheehan Natural Health Improvement Center

1301 East King Street
Lancaster, PA 17602
(717) 392-6606
SheehanChiropractic.com