When is the Best Time to Eat?

There’s something to the old wisdom of three squares a day.This week I have turned over the topic to Dr. Sheehan. In our office, we coach people on how to eat better to give the body its best shot at getting back to health. Many people have that they need to stop assaulting the body with unhealthy foods if they truly want to get well. But when to eat can also be important. So I asked Dr. Sheehan to comment on this question.

Dr. Sheehan says, “One of the current fads with diets is intermittent fasting. I’ll admit, I tried it myself (made me feel like doggie doo). Again and again, I find that the vast (as in 99.9%) of my patients do the best eating 3 meals a day, focusing on healthy proteins, fats, and veggies. I’ve attached a list of “Good Foods” for you to choose from. No one seems to do well skipping breakfast (sure you’ll lose weight short term with the calorie reduction), but it always seems to come back. Some diet gurus insist that you must not eat after 6pm. Once again, I find that it’s most important to eat 3 meals a day, it’s not important when you eat them (as long as you don’t skip a meal), and focus on proteins, fats, and veggies, from the “Good Foods” list. For some reason, people think that you’ve got to do something weird with your diet in order to lose weight and be healthy. Nope. Just 3 good meals a day, drink enough water, get enough sleep, and exercise every day.”

Could it be just that simple? Thanks for reminding us that being healthy does not mean doing anything weird. That’s why we love you!

Here is my food diary for the last several days:

Monday April 27, 2015

8:00AM: coffee with butter and coconut oil, chicken salad (raw mixed veggies, celery, green onion, cabbage, radish, lemon), mixed with peanut sauce

11:00 AM: pecans

3:00 PM: chili – ground beef, green onion, cabbage, radish, celery, canned crushed tomato, liver pudding

3:30 PM: more coffee with butter and coconut oil, teeccino

8:30 PM: chicken thigh stuffed with raw cheese, canadian bacon and sun-dried tomato, cashews

Tuesday April 28, 2015

8:00 AM: coffee with butter and coconut oil

9:00 AM: naked burger, canadian bacon, raw cheese, spinach, pecans

10:30 AM: teeccino

1:30 PM: chili (leftover from yesterday)

3:30 PM: PB meal bar

8 PM: cashews, leftover meatloaf from John J Jeffries, greens, mashed potato (not much), 1.5 glasses red wine

Wednesday April 29, 2015

6:00 AM: coffee with butter and coconut oil

8:00 AM: scrambled eggs, chicken sausage, green onions, liver pudding

11:45 AM: cocoa cherry bar

1 PM: cobb salad at the Philly train station. Ever been to that Deli? You pass by it on the way to the SEPTA trains. Great spot. Romaine, chicken, egg, bacon, avocado, tomato, bleu cheese, hold the dressing

2:30 PM: 1/2 sugar free chocolate bar

8:30 PM: GreekTowne Grille: Surf & Turf – NY Strip, shrimp, anchovies, black olives, small greek salad

Not bad for a travel day!!

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Whole Foods tomato

Whole Foods vs. Nutraceuticals

Let’s clear this up!I was listening to a lecture by Dr. Freddie Ulan, the founder of Nutrition Response TestingR, and among the many comments he made that struck me was one comment in particular about Nutraceuticals. He really clarified for me how nutraceuticals are different from whole foods in nutritional supplement form. Now pay close attention to this next part. I’m going to explain the difference between holistic healing and allopathic medicine. It’s not a secret, but it seems that the difference can be hard to get. They are actually two completely different approaches to handling a physical body. The key to understanding the difference lies with the functions of the nervous system. The nervous system, as you know, controls all of the life processes of the body. Digestion, heart rate, fluid balance, immune response, healing, everything. When confronted with a patient’s symptom or problem, the holistic practitioner asks the question “why” and then seeks to support the nervous system to encourage the body to do what it’s equipped to do from the beginning – and that is heal. An allopathic (aka medical) practitioner, when confronted with the same symptom or problem, seeks to provide an intervention that bypasses the nervous system–that is, forces a change in function to suppress the symptom. This is not healing, and is a failure in cases of chronic disease.

So if you remember, I started out this discussion with Dr. Ulan’s comment about Nutraceuticals. They are actually allopathic, and for that reason not the best approach in our opinion. They are “safer” drugs. They force a change on the nervous system. They are more gentle and less dangerous than pharmaceuticals, and this is certainly a plus considering the side effects of pharmaceuticals. I heard once a great analogy–it’s like when the check engine light comes on in a car. Allopathy cuts the wires to the light, or pulls the light out. Whereas the holistic approach will actually find where the car is malfunctioning and fix it. Whole foods in vitamin form, such as Standard Process makes, supply vitamins and minerals where there is a deficiency and thus work in harmony with the body’s healing process and nervous system so the body can finish the job it stalled out trying to finish. They provide the genuine replacement parts that the body needs to rebuild. No drug can do that.

So let’s get this straight. A Nutraceutical, and indeed ANY synthetic, laboratory-produced supplement (vitamin A, ascorbic acid, lutein, alpha-tocopherol, co-Q 10), and even herbs, yes, herbs, are actually allopathic. They only trying to suppress the symptom by bypassing the nervous system, not fix the problem. The most complete system I know of that truly heals body problems by working in harmony with the body is Designed Clinical Nutrition via Nutrition Response TestingR. We ask “why” and get the answer, then use whole foods to heal the problem. Just check out our testimonial pages to see for yourself. If you feel like maybe the “why” has been missed in your case and you want real solutions, give our office a call (717) 392-6606 and schedule an evaluation.

Here is my food diary for the past several days:

Sunday, April 19, 2015

9:30 AM: coffee with butter and coconut oil, haddock and shrimp baked with butter, lemon and garlic

11:00 AM: mixed nuts

1:30 PM: butternut squash soup with sausage, green onions and bone broth

7:30 PM: 1.5 glasses organic red wine, paleo chicken strips (YUM! My new cookbook by Kelly Bejelly is AWESOME!!) and peanut sauce

Monday, April 20, 2015

8:00 AM: coffee with butter and coconut oil, 5 slices Canadian bacon, 2 paleo biscuits, 2 eggs, peanut sauce

1:00 PM: mixed nuts, chili from California Tortilla

5:30 PM: You know, I didn’t write it down right away, and I forgot :((

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

9:30 AM: coffee with butter and coconut oil, mixed nuts, 2 chicken sausages

11:00 AM: black tea

12:30 PM: Burrito Bowl from Neato Burrito, beef, veg, guacamole, cheese (even though I asked for no cheese), beans, rice (even though I asked for no rice) 1:00 PM: coffee :))

7:30 PM: potato chips, naked burger on greens, mixed nuts

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

8:00 AM: coffee with butter and coconut oil, chicken pot pie (no pie crust tho) from Elana Amsterdam’s cookbook

11:00 AM: herb tea, pecans

2:00 PM: potato chips, protein shake: coconut milk, whey protein, SP Complete, radish greens

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The Fridge

My new favorite restaurant!I am always keeping my eyes and ears open for restaurants that have food I can eat that are not too expensive. And I recently heard about the Fridge. Now, I did know about it already, and I knew they had pizza and a large beer selection, but I DIDN’T know they had hot dogs from Sweet Stem Farm, roasted veggie salad, or anything gluten-free (which they do!). We went there on Saturday night with a friend, and I had a kim-chee hot dog with hummus and vegetables. Dr. Sheehan had a gluten free wrap with some kind of delicious hot dog. They were out of gluten free pita though. As a hypocrite, I also ordered a beer, a delicious oatmeal stout. I like stouts and porters for a cheat drink. YUM

So I will definitely go back there. I have been eating ground beef three times a day for the past week since getting sick (I’m feeling much better though) and The Fridge was a great change of pace!

Other favorites are: Texas Road House (yes, I’ll admit this is Dr. Sheehan’s favorite), Red Robin burgers on lettuce wraps with sweet potato fries, John J Jeffries (my all-time fav any chance I can get), Subway (in a pinch I order the salad with tuna salad on it), and right now I have a fantasy about going to DipCo tonight to have wings. I’m sure they’re not organic or free-range. So when I can’t have my ideal food and have some food that is not humanely or healthily produced, as much as I try to avoid it, I just say a prayer of thanks for the food and chalk it up to doing my best in this crazy world. At least I’m trying! And so are you, so that’s something to feel good about.

Here is my diet log for the last several days:

Saturday 4/10/2015

8AM: a few sips coffee, almonds, 1 bowl sausage butternut squash chili

1:00 PM: Annie Bailey’s: 1 Einstok Doppelbock, petite sheperd’s pie

7:30 PM: organic hot dog with kim chi (at the Fridge), hummus, raw veg, 1 pint of stout which I didn’t finish

Sunday – I didn’t write anything down!

Monday: 8AM: coffee with butter & coconut oil, 1 chicken sausage

1PM: chili from California Pizza Kitchen, tortilla strips

Afternoon: cough drops (SF), herb tea

8 PM: almonds, 2 small hamburgers on a bed of greens, kim chi

Tuesday 4/14/2015

9AM: few sips of my usual coffee, boring unsweet shake: cashew milk, radish greens, cashew butter, SP Complete dairy free (2 scoops), 1 scoop sprouted rice protein

2:30 PM: roasted salted cashews, ground beef, onion and purple cabbage

8PM: more cashews, 1 hamburger with fermented hot sauce on a bed of greens

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Fat Bombs!

Neither will they make you fat nor are they actually bombs 🙂I have been sick the last couple days and have had very little motivation to do anything, especially cook. However I think I will have to find the energy to make these Fat Bombs. My friend and fellow chiropractor’s wife Lori Suhrbier gave me this recipe. I will always love her for it!

Because of the excellent care I receive from my husband and also because I work hard on taking care of myself with a healthy diet, supplements, and exercise, I am not often ill. It does hit me from time to time (as I am still human). I think I have only taken antibiotics once in the last 5 years. So when I do get sick, the first thing I do is get a health check. Most of the time whatever supplements my body needs to support my immune system will head off the illness and I do not actually come down with it. And when I do end up with full-blown cold symptoms my supplements keep me functioning. Like I know I am sick but I can keep going until such a time as rest is appropriate. I also get adjusted as much as possible.

Remember, when you have acute symptoms, acute doses of supplements are in order (meaning lots), and as many adjustments and as much bodywork as possible. AND AVOID SUGAR AND DAIRY when you’re sick as well. Sugar cuts your immune response by 50% and dairy seems to gum up the system when you need to keep the channels of detoxification open. You can’t avoid getting sick completely because that is the nature of the world we live in, but these tips have stood me in good stead (this means these tips have been of great use and benefit to me).

Ok, now for the fat bomb recipe!

3/4 cup melted coconut oil

9 1/2 Tablespoons almond butter

60 drops stevia (you can skip this and they are still amazing)

3 Tablespoons cocoa powder

9 Tablespoons melted butter

Combine everything well in a bowl or food processor.

Pour the mixture into mini-cupcake tins and freeze. Just cover the bottom of the pan to about 1/2 inch thickness. Voila! Perfect for if you have a craving for bad sugary foods, have a fat bomb instead, as it packs a power punch of healthy fats!

Here is my food log for the last few days. I fell off the carb counting but I will get back on it.

Sunday 4/5/2015 Easter

6 AM: coffee with butter and coconut oil

7 AM: CC meal bar, 1/2 of a green juice

9:30 AM: bacon cheeseburger on a bed of greens, more green juice, leftover sugar free latte

1:00 PM: dinner with the fam at Bonefish Grill–iced tea, sashimi, ceviche, corn chips, shrimp & scallops with tomato, red pepper, potato, celery and bread

7:30 PM: baked haddock with butter, garlic and lemon on a bed of greens and lacto-fermented sauerkraut

Monday 4/6/2015

7:00 AM: 2 chicken sausages, coffee with butter and coconut oil

1:00 PM: herb tea, walnuts

1:30 PM: naked hamburger with salsa on a bed of greens with lacto-fermented sauerkraut

3:00 PM: more herb tea

7:30 PM: Texas Road House: a tequila, lime juice, and seltzer (my fav is the 1800 Reposado, just had to share since it took me much trial and error to figure out which one I liked best), chicken tenders, broccoli, green beans

Tuesday 4/7/2015

7:00 AM: coffee with butter and coconut oil

8:00 AM: 2 eggs & 4 thick-cut slices of bacon

12:00 PM: Red Robin: double wild west burger on a lettuce wrap, sweet potato fries

8:00 PM: walnuts, chili (hamburger, canned crushed tomato, onion, cabbage, leftover Red Robin chili mixed in, a few tortilla strips), 1 sip beer

Wednesday 4/8/2015

7:00 AM: coffee with butter and coconut oil

8:00 AM: cup of chili leftover 9:00 AM: herb tea, water, phosfood

1:00 PM: 2 chicken sausages

6:00 PM: tuna salad salad from Subway

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Don’t Eat Carbs For Breakfast, Kids

Don’t make the same mistake I did.

The other day I woke up early, like I usually do, and cooked myself a nice breakfast. I made eggs and sausage, and mixed them in with some quinoa and baby greens from the CSA. Now, I hadn’t made quinoa for months. It’s a grain, and most of the time grains do not disgrace the cooking pots and countertops in my kitchen. But I thought, this morning it will be fine, right? A little bit of yummy, nutty grain to mix in with my protein and veg? Kind of like a burrito bowl, sort of. I even put hot sauce on it. It was very yummy, and rather healthy as well. But for me, it was a mistake.

I’ll tell you why.

That little bit of carb in the morning from grain started me on a terrible carb binge that lasted all weekend. I couldn’t stay away from them! Sure, they were “permissible” carbs on my food plan, meaning they’ll only kill me slowly if I eat small amounts. But I was carbing out! Lard-cooked potato chips, paleo chocolate chip cookies, and *gasp* jerk chicken on a bed of rice and candied yams from Soul Food up the street, and beer!?! Sound harmless enough? By Sunday morning I was a sluggish, phlegm-y (is that a word), grouchy mess. That’s what carbs do to me. I was clearing my throat all day Sunday and I was not feeling too bright and sunny. I was already tired from working hard all week, but now I was exhausted! It’s taken me three days to recover.

The moral of the story, kids: don’t eat carbs for breakfast. Carbs for breakfast will just cause you to want more carbs the rest of the day.

I only have 2 days worth of food diary for you…the carbs made me do it 🙁

Monday 3/30/15

5:30 AM: coffee with butter and coconut oil

6:00 AM: 2 organic beef franks with chicken soup (kale, carrot onion, bone broth)(5)

10:00 AM: peanuts (6)

1:15 PM: 1 naked hamburger with mustard and lacto-fermented sauerkraut (5), raw walnuts (5)

3:00 PM: cinnamon spice herb tea

8:00 PM: Texas Road House: 1 piece of fried catfish that was bad, a bowl of chili (10), broccoli, green beans (6), peanuts (15)

Total carbs for Monday: 52

Tuesday 3/31/15

7AM: coffee with butter and coconut oil

9:00 AM: protein shake: cashew/coconut milk, 2 scoops dairy free SP Complete, 1 scoop whey protein, 1 cup spinach, 2 TBSP cashew butter (10)

10:00 AM: black tea

1:00 PM: “chicken bake”, chicken thigh with cabbage, carrot and garlic (10)

5:00 PM: walnuts (5)

7:30 PM: Red Robin take-out :): double bison burger (it’s called the Wild West burger) on a lettuce wrap (10-probably in the sauce), sweet potato fries (30)

Total carbs for Tuesday: 65

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Phenomenal Iodine!

A Little Iodine Can Make A Big Difference

Over 80% of people tested for iodine in the Midwest are deficient. Iodine is emerging as one of the most deficient and misunderstood nutrients. David Brownstein M.D., author of the book Iodine: Why You Need It, Why You Can’t Live Without It, believes that it is impossible to achieve optimal health if you do not have adequate iodine levels. He believes that iodine when taken in the inorganic nonradioactive form is the safest of all essential trace elements and can be taken daily for long periods of time.

Iodine is found in each of the cells in the body; and without it, life is not possible. It is responsible for the production of all the hormones of the body. Adequate levels are necessary for proper immune function as well as warding off bacteria,
parasites, viruses, and cancer. It alkalizes pH, and it is well known that an acidic chemistry is a major factor in many diseases.

Iodine has been used in treatment with the following conditions: ADD, atherosclerosis, fibrocystic breast disease and breast cancer, excess mucous
production, fatigue, hemorrhoids, headaches, hypertension, liver diseases, ovarian disease, prostate disorders and thyroid disorders.

In the body, the highest concentration of iodine is found in the thyroid. The next highest concentration is in the ovaries. The highest volume of iodine is found in breast tissue, but iodine is present in every cell of the body and is required for healthy cellular metabolism.

Iodine deficiency can cause mental retardation, goiter, increased child and infant mortality, and infertility. In fact, iodine deficiency disorder is the most common preventable form of mental retardation known.

Iodine is found in seawater, ocean fish, and specifically seaweed. It is added back into commercial salt since bleaching depletes it of iodine and other minerals. Sea salt is available that has not been bleached, and therefore still contains natural occurring iodine.

Iodine is so deficient in the Midwest it is considered the “goiter belt.” Other inland areas are also known by the same name because of a much higher incidence of goiter due to a lack of natural iodine.

The RDA for iodine is 150 mcg supposedly the amount of iodine needed to prevent disease. Dr. Brownstein and his colleagues’ feel these numbers are far too low as many countries such as Japan ingests 13 mg or more per day. That’s 86 times more than is suggested by our RDA.

The U.S. has the highest incidence of breast cancer. Japan’s breast cancer level is the lowest in the world. The U.S. life expectancy rating is 48th of the 226 countries. Japan is 6th. Our infant mortality rate is 7 per 1000 births. Japan is 3.5 per 1000 which is the lowest incidence in the world. Yet when the Japanese relocate to this country and adopt our diet, they quickly join the U.S. statistics
for cancer, life expectancy, and infant mortality.

Two reasons why we are so deficient in iodine are: First, and obviously, we don’t ingest enough iodine every day. Second, the little iodine we ingest gets displaced or pushed out of the essential tissues.

Remember the periodic chart of elements that we studied in chemistry? You may recall a highly reactive group called the halogens on the right side of the chart. As you know, the elements at the top of a column displace the elements below.
Reading from top to bottom in the halogen family we have fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine. In other words, chlorine, bromine and fluorine push iodine out of our cells.

Fluorine is a known carcinogen and is present in our drinking water and in many of our drugs such as Cipro, Lipitor, Prozac, Paxil, and Effexor.

Chlorine is also found in our drinking water and in many drugs such as Zoloft and Wellbutrin. Chlorine is considered a neurotoxin and is used as a pesticide. It is a major ingredient in the new miracle sweetener Splenda.

Most people are not aware that bromine, another iodine displacer, is a major player in our diet. Before the 1980’s, iodine was used as an anticaking agent in breads and other baking products. Some researchers felt that iodine could cause problems with the thyroid gland, so in the 1980’s it was replaced with bromine. Bromine interferes with iodide uptake and utilization in the thyroid gland. Bromine is a toxic element and is considered a chemical that causes goiters. This substitution has been in large part responsible for the declining iodine levels in the U.S.

So the point of the halogen illustration is this: Fluorine, chlorine, and bromine all displace iodine. To displace means to push out or mobilize. Iodine which is already deficient in our diet is being displaced by other more aggressive
elements that can actually poison enzyme systems.

So if we take lowered cellular levels due to dietary deficiencies and add the halogens which further deplete this essential nutrient, we can see why iodine deficiency is so rampant. There are two tests doctors can use to test iodine levels. One is called the iodine patch test; the other is called the iodine loading test. The patch test has been criticized because it is a screen and does not give qualitative numbers. As such it is difficult to say when to stop supplementing with iodine. I like it because it is inexpensive and easy to understand. You can click on the web page and get a written discussion for both tests and labs that perform the qualitative 24 hour urine test.

Here’s the short version of the patch test and something you can do at home. Apply iodine on the skin in one inch square area. Iodine is a stain, and it is important to avoid staining one’s clothes. The stain should be visible for 24 hours. The faster the stain disappears… the more likely the degree
of deficiency. You will be amazed at how fast some of the stains disappear. Considering how many things iodine affects, treatment of iodine deficiency can make a big difference.

As I stated earlier, iodine is found in each of the cells in the body. Without it, life is not possible. It is responsible for the production of all the hormones of the body, so a little iodine can make a big difference.

Credentials of holistic doctors.

Q: Hello, I am leaning towards go towards a holistic doctor and approach to how I live my life. I’m curious as to what type of educational background Dr. Sheehan has before I set up an appointment. Please email me a list of credentials. Thank you! -Karen

A: Dr. Sheehan is a chiropractor, graduating from New York Chiropractic College in April ’97, magna cum laude, and Valedictorian. He also has a Bachelor of Science from Excelsior College. He has been practicing complementary therapies since he started in practice in 1997. He focuses his post graduate education in holistic nutrition. Hope this helps!

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Natural fertility support?

Dear Dr. Keith,

Q: I just had 2 surgeries last year for endometriosis and had unexplained infertility for 9 years until the surgery found many problems that were then fixed. This was the first time I ever got a reason for my infertility. I also am diagnosed with chronic daily migraines that are being treated medically and they have told me not to see a chiropractor for an adjustment. Can you help with the infertility? I am also a vegetarian.


Dear Beth,

A: One thing that I noticed when I began practice in Chiropractic was that couples who were previously considered infertile would conceive!  When talking with other Chiropractors, I found that this was a common occurrence when undergoing chiropractic care: increased fertility.
Studies done by Standard Process and Mediherb show over 80% success rate in conceiving after undergoing Nutritional Therapy.
I myself have noticed that upwards of 80% of patients who were considered infertile are able to conceive after undergoing a course of care here at Sheehan Chiropractic.
Why are these numbers so high, and it’s not commonly known that we can help?  In short, it’s because as Chiropractors and Naturopaths, we do not treat disease, we support the patient towards achieving better health.  As a consequence, couples usually become more fertile, but we’re not treating the infertility.  In a society that’s disease based, disease is talked about, not health. In short, after a proper exam, I’ll be able to tell you how I can help you increase your health.

Hope this helps.
Dr. Keith

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